Sourcing

Sourcing

As assets for the communities in which they are grown, the nuts that we source are powerhouses of environmental conservation, economic independence, gender equality, public health, and wildlife protection. The map below illustrates the wide variety of our sourcing locations. Because of our close relationships with growers across the globe, we are able to source the best quality nuts at the best price! This is especially true with our Cashew, Brazil, and Marcona growers. To discover the impact made in these communities, read about our sustainability efforts below!

CASHEWS

West Africa

While Africa grows almost 60% of the world’s cashews, a much smaller percentage is being processed in these local communities. By exporting this value-added commodity to other countries for processing, the value chain of this industry is being taken out of the country. This means less jobs circulating within the origin countries and stunted economic growth in these communities. Caro Nut has teams on the ground that work with cashew growers across West Africa and Vietnam to increase the percentage of nuts that are grown and processed within these communities.

Even though cashews are not indigenous to West Africa, reforestation programs have propelled this area into the dominant agricultural region for this special nut.

Meet some of our West African partners and learn how the construction of modern processing facilities is creating jobs and economic self-determination. To read more about our efforts, check out our 2018 Transparency Report !

CASHEWS

West Africa

Cashews

MIGHTY
BRAZIL

Amazon

MIGHTY
BRAZIL

Amazon

BRAZIL NUTS

MIGHTY
BRAZIL

Our efforts in the Amazon are about preserving a complete ecosystem that is threatened by illegal mining and deforestation.

Entire indigenous communities living in remote areas of the Amazon forest depend on this “Amazon Almond” for their livelihood.

Journey with us as we partner with these remote communities to build a viable value chain.

MARCONA
ALMONDS

Spain

Native to Spain and very fickle, this endangered variety of almond known as the “Queen of Almonds” could have easily been replaced by other higher-yielding orchard crops that are more predictable and profitable to farmers. However, by supporting grower co-ops and building a demand for these nuts, we see this unique variety of almond thriving in the US market.

See how growers share their passion and vision in rejuvenating this delicate and sought-after snacking nut.

MARCONA
ALMONDS

Spain

Marconas